Kip Moore Kicks Off the Me & My Kind Tour

KIP MOORE – ME & MY KIND TOUR (Lowell, MA – October 20, 2016)

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Written by Guest Contributor: Lydia Simonetti

Kip Moore is currently out on the road headlining his “Me And My Kind” tour with Jon Pardi, and for select dates, Will Bowen.  Last Thursday, the tour stopped in Lowell,  Massachusetts (just outside Boston) to play at the Tsongas Center.  Kip has an affinity for the city of Boston and with a very strong fan base in the area, consistently sells out his shows there.  In fact, at the show I met up with fans from across the country who flew in or drove many hours to attend the show because it was in Boston.  I met fans who came in from North Dakota, Colorado, South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, Pennsylvania, New York and New Hampshire.  

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The VIP experience is always something special and this was one of the best I’ve experienced.  The ticket description says fans will enjoy a 2 song acoustic performance, but Moore always goes way beyond.  He takes fan requests and is often stumped by die-hards who throw out titles he admittedly has a hard time remembering the lyrics to, but tries regardless.  During this VIP set he played a 9 song set which included a few new tunes and he paused to share some of the stories behind his lyrics.  While playing “Guitar Man”, he told the crowd the song will be on the new album due out in 2017 and went on to explain that he remembers “being the faceless, nameless guy on stage…and it can be a lonely, lonely journey”.  Closing out the acoustic VIP set with the anthemic, “That Was Us”, as he explained how he had to fight to get the song on his ‘Wild One’s album.  Moore said “I refuse to sing songs I’m not passionate about and that’s one of them”. Before leaving the stage he thanked the crowd and said “Boston, you always show me your heart”.

VIP Set List

  1. “Boys Gotta Do”
  2. “Too Young To Die”
  3. “Lipstick”
  4. “Guitar Man”
  5. “Hang Awhile”
  6. “Tougher Than The Rest”
  7. “Mary Was the Marrying Kind”
  8. “Blonde”
  9. “That Was Us”

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Singer/Songwriter Will Bowen took the stage next to warm up the crowd with a short but very impressive acoustic set.  Bowen has a gritty sound that exudes emotion.  While he may not be a well known name, he’s already found a great amount of success in other genres and even has a Grammy nomination.  He’s signed to Little Extra Music and is currently working with many top artists in Nashville.  Bowen also showed his love for the city of Boston by showing the crowd his Larry Bird socks.  

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Next up was Jon Pardi.  Pardi has had recent radio success with songs such as “Head Over Boots”, “What I Can’t Put Down”, “Dirt On My Boots” and “Up All Night”.  While the majority of the crowd seemed to sing along to most of his set, I was not very familiar with most of the songs.

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Kip Moore took the stage around 9:30pm and true to his nature he and his band “The Slow Hearts”  came out ready to rock the crowd opening with “Lipstick”.  The crowd especially enjoying the line “Way up above Dixie, Boston, Jersey, New York City”.  He played a mix of old and new songs even covering the Jimmy Eat World hit “The Middle”.   He then transitioned into an more relaxed, acoustic vibe playing tunes such as “Running For You” and “Hearts Desire”.  All the while the crowd sang almost every word back to him.  Moore then left the stage briefly to return (wearing his beloved Larry Bird jersey) with his full band for a high energy 5 song encore finishing with “Dirt Road”.  Throughout the entire show, Moore took many opportunities to thank his fans for all of the support they continue to show him.  Explaining that money isn’t what fuels him, it’s the fans that come out show after show and show he and the band how much they relate to his music.

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Having attended many, many Kip Moore shows, Boston is always one of my favorite venues to see one of his shows in and this was certainly no exception.  It’s clear that he feels something for the city and his fans there.  Once again in an effort to show his appreciation for his fans Moore stayed after the show to sign for every single fan at the merchandise booth.  I’ve got to tell you, that’s dedication and appreciation!  Having just played for almost two hours and leaving everything you have out on stage to then stay until the last fan meets him is something unique.  He’s a class act in an industry that currently seems to be overwhelmed with radio sell-outs.  Moore is an artist who stands up for and makes the music he believes in.

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Bottom line-do whatever it takes to get to a Kip Moore show, you won’t be disappointed!

Kip Moore Set List

  1. “Lipstick”
  2. “Wild Ones”
  3. “What I Do”
  4. “Beer Money”
  5. “Up All Night”
  6. “The Middle”
  7. “I’m To Blame”
  8. “Come And Get It”
  9. “Backseat”
  10. “Cigarette”
  11. “Young Love”
  12. “Thats Alright With Me”
  13. “Running For You”
  14. “Complicated”
  15. “Hearts Desire”
  16. “Crazy One More Time”
  17. Encore:
  18. “Magic”
  19. “Hey Pretty Girl”
  20. “Something Bout’ A Truck”
  21. “That Was Us”
  22. “Dirt Road”

 

Track by Track Discussion: Heart Of A Flatland Boy with Erik Dylan

Track by Track Discussion: Heart Of A Flatland Boy with Erik Dylan

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I had the privilege of sitting down and having a track by track discussion with Erik Dylan, regarding his new, independent album, entitled “Heart of A Flatland Boy”.  I hope you all buy or download the album because it really is a breath of fresh air in this day in age of country music.  The following are my thoughts after listening to the album followed by where the origins of each song came from by the artist himself …

 

Heart of a Flatland Boy

 

MTMS: When I hear this song, I hear a straight up heartland song written for the people who work hard and won’t be knocked down, no matter what. And the way you sing it is raw and unapologetic, sort of the way those its written for live their life.

Erik Dylan:  Where I’m from in Kansas, we have a lot to be thankful for.  But we also have a lot to be angry about.  My people don’t get enough credit for what they do.  They are the ones who clock in every day, drive tractors, pour steel, bust their asses and raise their babies.  They are also the first to get screwed, laid off, and forgotten.  I’m just sick of it.  I guess I would consider this song an anthem for the under appreciated shrinking middle class.  I feel like in many ways it is my job as a songwriter to write vicariously through them.  And I’m damn proud to take that job.

 

 

It Aint Broke

MTMS: I love how this song was strategically placed the follow Heart of a Flatland Boy, as its also written about the small town people, but less from the point of view of not being knocked down, but more about how much they love the life they live and appreciate the small time living. The verse about the guy giving up the scholarship for love and a piece of land, but not regretting it really stands out.

Erik Dylan:  This song is best described as pure flatland philosophy. If something is working, don’t fix it. There is a beauty in knowing some things will never change. It inspires me. I wrote it about my hometown in Kansas but honestly, this could be anybody’s hometown. It’s beautiful to me.  I watch wrecking balls turn history into high rises & parking lots every day on Music Row. It wasn’t broke. It was alive. They broke it. Glad that won’t happen in my town.

 

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Pink Flamingos

MTMS: To say I love this song would be an understatement. From the edgy songwriting to the musical breakdown, this is a hell of a song.  Who thought that a song about getting revenge from domestic abuse could also be so catchy.  Where did you come from in writing this one?

Erik Dylan: I had that phrase “pushing up pink flamingos” in my head for a few months. When I sat down to write the song with Adam James we came to the conclusion that somebody just had to die in this song.  We didn’t want it to go down the typical murder ballad road. I wanted to write it from the perspective of the people who saw what happened and looked the other way. I’m not saying it is right, but I do understand why they pled the fifth. Sometimes bad shit happens to good people. And sometimes small town justice prevails.

 

Willie Nelson T-Shirt

 

MTMS: So many emotions run through my mind when hearing this song. It starts with true love, then immediately switches to heartbreak, anger, disgust, and then humor.  It’s clever and fun, while still being heartbreaking.  How are you able to execute both sides in a single song as a songwriter?

Erik Dylan: I think this is pretty typical of most guys. It is our grieving process after being done wrong. Hurt turns to anger. Anger turns to disgust. And in the end the all you can do is get your favorite Willie Nelson T-shirt back and try to make her jealous as hell on the rebound.

 

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The Good Life

MTMS: Out of all the songs on the album, I could see this being the live show anthem. It’s got such a build and emotional progression.  It’s relatable to every listener and brings about a sense of optimism no matter how dark life seems.  The line “life ain’t worth living if it ain’t hard” hits you in the heart and gut at the same time.

Erik Dylan: I felt like writing a song that celebrates the struggle of living the so-called “good life”. This song is a tip of the hat to every guy that takes care of their family and hangs in no matter the cost. It’s a song for the ones who get through the rough patches running on faith and love. My dad is one of those guys. I want to be that guy for my family.

 

Girl That Got Away

 

MTMS: Your album does not have the prototypical love song, where the writer describes all the great feelings he has when he’s in love. Instead, you bring a heart wrenching approach that brings all the emotions to the surface right after you lose the girl of your dreams and it was all your fault.  The slow build and the background sound effects make this a hauntingly beautiful song.

Erik Dylan: I wanted the lyric to stand front and center. I’m incredibly prod of this lyric and wouldn’t change a word. Jake Mitchell & Westin Davis wrote the hell out of this song with me. The music needed to enhance the emotion in my voice. The steel guitar haunts me. Russ Pahl set the mood with steel and created a vehicle for the listener to follow the lyric in. It’s a song about missing a one in a million girl. It had to be dark. I am proud how it turned out.

 

Astronaut

MTMS: When I first heard this song, I thought what the hell? But, each time I hear it I love it more and find myself singing “Copenhagen habit and a GED”.  And it is situated perfectly in the track list as it changes direction from the seriousness for a song and just lets your rock out.  Where did the idea of how this song was going to be sung come from?

Erik Dylan:

I needed a black sheep for the record and Astronaut was perfect. We sped the song up 6 clicks and went Ramones on it.
The idea came from a construction worker running a jackhammer outside my publishing office. I was writing with Randy Montana & Driver Williams that day. It was loud all day. Another writer from the building dropped in on us bitching and moaning about how loud it was. I turned to him and said “Ok… We write about our feelings all day at our job. That guy runs a jackhammer for 8 hours a day. Shut the F up.” That’s how the idea started.

 

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Your Way Down

 

MTMS: This seems to have the simple message of a guy who is so in love with a woman that he tells her he will wait for her. But it has a little twist, as he throws a dig in there that he knows she will climb the ladder and fall back down.

Erik Dylan: I have seen this a million times. The girl that thinks there is something better to chase out there in the world. She walks out on the one guy who really loves her and has the strength to do it because she has a parachute. He’s gonna be there when she falls because he truly loves her. There is a lot of anger in this tune but I think it is warranted. However, if you love somebody you have to forgive them eventually if you ever want a shot at that white picket fence & two kids in the yard.

 

 

Fishing Alone 

MTMS: I am an emotional train wreck when I hear this song. The songwriting and the story are just perfection. I think the lyrics speak for themselves for all who listen.  My question is how in the world do you hold it together enough to sing it live?

Erik Dylan: I don’t. I had tears in my eyes at my last show. I’m never going to hide my emotions on stage. I think I owe my audience that kind of honesty. It’s ok to feel something. That’s why we are here. That song continues to make me feel something every night. It reminds me to call the ones I love and never take them for granted.

 

Map Dot Town

 

MTMS: When I hear this song I get such a sense of nostalgia mixed with pride as I think every listener will bring themselves back to a time in their life where the words from this song connect with them. I know I have heard a version backed by a full band, but you chose the acoustic version for the album.  I think it’s a poignant conclusion to this heartland adventure, how did you come about that decision?

Erik Dylan:  I wanted the listener to hear the song how it was written. One guitar and one voice in a room. It had to be all about the song. I wanted the world to hear it on my back porch at 2am with Jake Mitchell when we wrote it. The only thing this recording is missing is the sound of the crickets in my backyard.

I know where I’m from. It has made me who I am. The heart of this flatland boy will always be in Muscotah, Kansas. I write what I know. And I know where home is.